dylanmeconis:

Here’s an art project I’ve been wanting to do for ages.
From fifth grade (when I was friends with a girl who had a prodigious Marvel comics habit, and the X-Men cartoon was on TV) through middle school, I created a league of superheroines and supervillainesses.
(No dudes; they were boring, and there were enough of them already.)
 The league was called MASK, after the mysterious founding superheroine, who we see here.
The first character drawings I created (with outlines traced from How to Draw the Marvel Way!) vanished at some point, but I still have the later, more original drawings, dating from 1995 - 1997.
I actively roleplayed these characters with various friends over the years. There were no comics, per se, but the games were dreadfully fun. 
In sixth grade I went on to a new school and lost touch with my X-Men expert friend, whom I’ll call “Erin.” A fellow member of our little superhero friend-group wound up in my class, and one day she brought Erin along for a visit. Erin had always been a little snarky and edgy (as much as is possible in fifth grade…), and by seventh grade she had apparently completed her metamorphosis into full-blown Sullen 90’s Teen. 
I approached her, nervously engaged with her withering glare, and told her that I still drew superheroes. 
"That’s really sad," she snarled.
I promptly shriveled up and blew away. 
Erin’s remark hurt me terribly, although it didn’t deal a mortal blow. How could it? I was the kid who drew cartoon strawberries on her jeans with fabric markers while the other girls were discovering purple lipstick. My own superpower was a total inability to edit my behavior in order to mimic my peers.  
By ninth grade I had moved on from superheroes. But I didn’t stop drawing, or reading comics, or playing pretend, or caring. And, in retrospect, I can look past the personal wound of that moment, scan for clues, and feel some worry for Erin; no happy kid adopts a defensive crouch that deep.
Recently there’s been a wonderful trend of superhero comics starring strong, cool, smart, appealing-but-not-fetishized female characters, who probably would’ve thrilled my middle-school self to the core. Kelly Sue DeConnick and G. Willow Wilson in particular are creating heroes that I’m certain are inspiring a new generation of girls. 
I’m not normally a superhero artist, but I felt this was as good a time as any to pull out this old work and try redrawing it. A time-travel tribute to the spunky, passionate, weird little kid who hung in there and kept going with this stuff, and who has plenty of supportive company these days. 
I’ve got a couple dozen of these profile drawings, and I’ll see how many I can get through in my spare time.
To kick off, I’ll give a brief account of the superlady you see before you.
CODE NAME: MASK
REAL NAME: ???
POWERS: CLASSIFIED
MY RECOLLECTION: Mask is the founding member of the superheroine league, also called MASK, but with capital letters for some reason. Although she recruited every member (most of them as teenagers, a la Xavier’s School for the Gifted), nobody in the league knows Mask’s real name or background. She seems to be a telepath, and maybe telekinetic, but the full extent of her powers remains a mystery.
Secretly, she was an embodiment of Lachesis, one of the three Fates from ancient Greek mythology (the OTHER thing I was obsessed with at the time). I can’t recall how this actually impacted the storyline other than her ability to foresee major events and a kind of Doctor Who ability to regenerate in a new body, but it was a big reveal. 
DESIGN NOTES: I think this is the earliest of all the drawings I still have. The pose is very stiff, although the character was also very emotionally understated, so I think I was partially trying to convey her reserve. It looks like I colored it entirely with felt markers; later drawings have a lot more colored pencil in them.
Mask’s “mask” is a relic from fifth grade drawings. As I recall, originally the mask extended way off her face, a bit like Jean Grey’s. The graphic yellow streak was the emblem of the league. 
The fact that Mask is wearing a choker just proves that it was the 90’s and, although I still wore tapered jeans from Lands End, I wasn’t completely impervious to girl fashion trends of the moment. Man, I wanted a choker. 
I think you can see the influence of Star Trek in her bodysuit. I grew up in a Trekkie household during Next Gen years, so geometric shoulder patterns were a known aesthetic. 
In other news, look at Little Dylan, not afraid of drawing hands! Or kneecaps.
In the updated version: I got rid of the choker because it is now 2014. The only other substantive change I made was to add some of that bright yellow to her boots so the mask and the suit aren’t completely unrelated, and add a LITTLE energy into her pose. In terms of body-type, I decided my younger self was going for a look that was fit but not super-sexy or extra muscular, so I decided she’s a bit like a gymnast.
I also made her sleeves a little over-long; I imagine her tugging them down over her knuckles when she wants to looks extra mysterious. The choker of 2014, perhaps.
NEXT UP: T’LALET.

dylanmeconis:

Here’s an art project I’ve been wanting to do for ages.

From fifth grade (when I was friends with a girl who had a prodigious Marvel comics habit, and the X-Men cartoon was on TV) through middle school, I created a league of superheroines and supervillainesses.

(No dudes; they were boring, and there were enough of them already.)

The league was called MASK, after the mysterious founding superheroine, who we see here.

The first character drawings I created (with outlines traced from How to Draw the Marvel Way!) vanished at some point, but I still have the later, more original drawings, dating from 1995 - 1997.

I actively roleplayed these characters with various friends over the years. There were no comics, per se, but the games were dreadfully fun. 

In sixth grade I went on to a new school and lost touch with my X-Men expert friend, whom I’ll call “Erin.” A fellow member of our little superhero friend-group wound up in my class, and one day she brought Erin along for a visit. Erin had always been a little snarky and edgy (as much as is possible in fifth grade…), and by seventh grade she had apparently completed her metamorphosis into full-blown Sullen 90’s Teen. 

I approached her, nervously engaged with her withering glare, and told her that I still drew superheroes. 

"That’s really sad," she snarled.

I promptly shriveled up and blew away. 

Erin’s remark hurt me terribly, although it didn’t deal a mortal blow. How could it? I was the kid who drew cartoon strawberries on her jeans with fabric markers while the other girls were discovering purple lipstick. My own superpower was a total inability to edit my behavior in order to mimic my peers.  

By ninth grade I had moved on from superheroes. But I didn’t stop drawing, or reading comics, or playing pretend, or caring. And, in retrospect, I can look past the personal wound of that moment, scan for clues, and feel some worry for Erin; no happy kid adopts a defensive crouch that deep.

Recently there’s been a wonderful trend of superhero comics starring strong, cool, smart, appealing-but-not-fetishized female characters, who probably would’ve thrilled my middle-school self to the core. Kelly Sue DeConnick and G. Willow Wilson in particular are creating heroes that I’m certain are inspiring a new generation of girls. 

I’m not normally a superhero artist, but I felt this was as good a time as any to pull out this old work and try redrawing it. A time-travel tribute to the spunky, passionate, weird little kid who hung in there and kept going with this stuff, and who has plenty of supportive company these days. 

I’ve got a couple dozen of these profile drawings, and I’ll see how many I can get through in my spare time.

To kick off, I’ll give a brief account of the superlady you see before you.

CODE NAME: MASK

REAL NAME: ???

POWERS: CLASSIFIED

MY RECOLLECTION: Mask is the founding member of the superheroine league, also called MASK, but with capital letters for some reason. Although she recruited every member (most of them as teenagers, a la Xavier’s School for the Gifted), nobody in the league knows Mask’s real name or background. She seems to be a telepath, and maybe telekinetic, but the full extent of her powers remains a mystery.

Secretly, she was an embodiment of Lachesis, one of the three Fates from ancient Greek mythology (the OTHER thing I was obsessed with at the time). I can’t recall how this actually impacted the storyline other than her ability to foresee major events and a kind of Doctor Who ability to regenerate in a new body, but it was a big reveal. 

DESIGN NOTES: I think this is the earliest of all the drawings I still have. The pose is very stiff, although the character was also very emotionally understated, so I think I was partially trying to convey her reserve. It looks like I colored it entirely with felt markers; later drawings have a lot more colored pencil in them.

Mask’s “mask” is a relic from fifth grade drawings. As I recall, originally the mask extended way off her face, a bit like Jean Grey’s. The graphic yellow streak was the emblem of the league. 

The fact that Mask is wearing a choker just proves that it was the 90’s and, although I still wore tapered jeans from Lands End, I wasn’t completely impervious to girl fashion trends of the moment. Man, I wanted a choker. 

I think you can see the influence of Star Trek in her bodysuit. I grew up in a Trekkie household during Next Gen years, so geometric shoulder patterns were a known aesthetic. 

In other news, look at Little Dylan, not afraid of drawing hands! Or kneecaps.

In the updated version: I got rid of the choker because it is now 2014. The only other substantive change I made was to add some of that bright yellow to her boots so the mask and the suit aren’t completely unrelated, and add a LITTLE energy into her pose. In terms of body-type, I decided my younger self was going for a look that was fit but not super-sexy or extra muscular, so I decided she’s a bit like a gymnast.

I also made her sleeves a little over-long; I imagine her tugging them down over her knuckles when she wants to looks extra mysterious. The choker of 2014, perhaps.

NEXT UP: T’LALET.

greyallison:

Some of my commissions from emeraldcitycomicon last weekend! Batgirl and Firestorm from DC Comics, Tenzin and Iroh from Avatar: The Last Airbender, Jareth from the Labyrinth, and Wedge Antilles from Star Wars. The last one in particular was a blast!

.@rondanchan explores the possibilitiesof Asus VivoTab Note 8 as an art tablet.

rondanchan:

ASUS VivoTab Note 8: Can it art?

Yes it can. It’s not without a few issues, but this little tablet has some great potential.

I do 99% of my art digitally these days, so I have had quite a number of devices. Currently, I’m using a Wacom Cintiq 13HD connected to a laptop to work at the office, and a Wacom Cintiq Companion when I’m working at home or at a client’s office. The VivoTab isn’t really in the same league as those, but it’s not really meant to be, either. It’s an 8 inch tablet that costs $300. The Cintiq Companion costs $2000.

The reason I bought this little guy was because I wanted a very portable device that I could do digital sketching on that would fit into my satchel. I looked into the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 as well, but wasn’t terribly encouraged by the reviews I saw. However great the hardware may be, Android just doesn’t have a full-function drawing program like I’d want. 

The VivoTab, however, runs a full version of Windows 8. Real programs like my beloved Manga Studio 5 could be installed. The portability of an 8 inch tablet, the software of a full computer, built-in Wacom digitizer, and only $300? SOLD. 

Let’s talk about how it works.

Operating System

Yep, this runs Windows 8. Some people don’t like Windows 8, and that’s cool. I find it a little clunky at times, but quite usable once you know your way around. I’m not gonna go into the OS here. If Windows 8 is a deal killer for you, this isn’t the tablet you’re looking for.

Size, Weight, Appearance

At just under 5.5” x 8.75” in size and just under a pound in weight, the portability on this is pretty great. It’s a slightly bulkier and heavier after I added a case, but I like to keep my devices protected. Just the right size for what I wanted - big enough to not feel tiny, but small enough to fit into my bag easily. The construction feels sturdy, and the screen colors look good. Worthy of note is that the included stylus is awful. Truly terrible for drawing. It technically does has pressure sensitivity, but only barely so. It’s extremely hard to control, and is basically all or nothing. Luckily, the Wacom Bamboo Feel Stylus for tablet PCs is compatible, and is excellent. If you’re gonna use this to draw, you need this stylus. It’ll cost you $40, making the actual price of this thing $340… $355 if you also include the case I bought for it.

Performance

This is definitely not a powerhouse, but neither is it weak. It runs an Intel Atom Z3740 Quad-Core processor, and has 2 GB of RAM. I’m not savvy enough to really know how that compares to other tablets, but I will say that the drawing I did above was an 8.5”x11” document at 400 DPI, and I only experienced negligible to minor levels of lag while doing linework, and moderate levels while painting. NOT BAD, little buddy, not bad at all. Every once and a while, I got a ghost stroke, however. Almost like a hiccup, where I’d try to make a stroke, it would stutter, and nothing would happen.

Setup

So, one major thing to note about the VivoTab is that while it runs a full version Windows, it lacks one major thing that a typical PC would have: A USB Port. The only way to get stuff on and off of this thing is either via wireless connection, or by using the MicroSD slot. This can present some issues, especially for Manga Studio 5 users. (EDIT: Good news! The following paragraph will soon be irrelevant, as it looks like digital versions of Manga Studio will be returning.)

At present, for some reason or another, Smith Micro stopped selling digital versions of Manga Studio 5. You can ONLY get it as a physical copy, on a disc. The VivoTab has no USB port to connect to an external optical drive, so how the hell does one even put Manga Studio on this thing? Luckily for me, I still had the digital install files for MS5 from when they DID have a digital version. I just loaded them up onto the MicroSD card that came with the tablet. I still had to buy a new physical copy just to get the serial number to activate the software, however. (It’s only $25 on Amazon!) If you’re not lucky enough to have said files, I have no idea how you would get MS5 onto this thing. Maybe make an ISO of the install disc and run it using a virtual disc drive? I dunno, it sounds plausible - good luck with that.

Drawing Time

I got MS5 installed, loaded up my Frenden brushes, and installed the latest version of the Wacom Feel driver from the Wacom website. Time to start drawing.

Wait. Nope. Not yet. For some reason, when I boot up MS5, the pen calibration on the canvas is completely whack. Left is up, right is down, down, up is right… It’s all over the place. Flipping the tablet around to reorient it only migrates this wackness with it. This only happens when I’m in Manga Studio - it returns to normal when I switch to another program. Regardless, I open up the tablet settings menu and hit calibrate. For some reason, it does not respond to my pen. I can only wait a few seconds until it cancels itself out. Hmmmm. Troubling.

I go back to Manga Studio and enter the preferences. Switching the Tablet settings from WinTab to Tablet PC fixes the calibration issue. Sweet. Time to start drawing.

Sensitivity feels good with the Bamboo stylus. Not Cintiq good, but definitely good enough to draw with. After tweaking the pressure setting in MS5 to give it a slower gain, the pressure feels even better. I can make thin lines and thick lines fairly easily. It’s still not Cintiq-good, but I didn’t expect it to be. I’d say it’s maybe 75% of the way there. One problem though: I’m getting some funky initial brush lag at the the beginning of every stroke, and especially for short strokes. It’s workable if I’m patient, but it’s also pretty annoying. Time to tweak more settings.

Pen and Touch settings… pen flicks off, press and hold to right click off… try again. Still got that beginning lag. It feels more responsive if I put it back in WinTab mode, but I can’t use WinTab mode due to the calibration wackness. I’m puzzled. Lost. Time to start uninstalling stuff.

I uninstall the Wacom Feel driver and try again. No change. I remember that on a previous computer, I had a calibration issue in MS when I changed monitor resolutions, and fixed it by uninstalling and reinstalling MS. I uninstall Manga Studio.

I reinstall both the Wacom Feel driver as well as MS5, making for DAMN SURE that my VivoTab stays in the same orientation during the entire process, hoping that will fix the WinTab orientation problem.

It doesn’t.

Everything is installed again, and WinTab still can’t get its bearings straight. I switch back to Tablet PC, resigning myself to brush strokes that have startup lag. BUT WAIT - THERE IS NONE. Everything is coming out smoothly now, and I have no idea why. I, literally, have no friggin’ idea what fixed that problem, but it is fixed, and now making brush strokes is silky smooth. YESSSS

Stock Manga Studio 5 doesn’t have full touch support, so I go to the Smith Micro website to get the free update. After installing it, navigating my document using pinch-to-zoom, and two-finger drag to pan works intuitively, if a bit laggy.

The drawing feels great, so I don’t even care. Time to do some serious testing! I did the drawing above and it feels good. Palm-rejection is solid. While the pen is active, touch doesn’t interfere. Everything is awesome.

Other notes

Battery life on this thing seems decent. Fairly long lived if I’m just putzing around the OS and using Windows apps, significantly shorter if I’m working on 400 DPI drawings in Manga Studio, but still not bad. I’d estimate you could probably get 4 hours of drawtime on this or so, but haven’t really put it to the test.

I haven’t installed Photoshop on this yet, and probably won’t, so I can’t really say how it would perform. I’m only planning on using the VivoTab for sketching, so I have no need for photoshop, as I do all of my drawing in MS5 these days. I only boot up PS for effects, color tweaks, and file prep. It’s possible the WinTab issues may affect drawing in PS as well, but I’m tempted to say probably not - it felt like it was likely a Manga Studio specific bug to me. Who knows - your mileage may vary.

Like with all larger Cintiqs, the cursor calibration becomes more and more off as you near the edges of the screen. This is magnified when you’re on a screen this small, so it will take more patience to draw with this, as you’ll have to center your drawing more often, and menus will be significantly harder to click.

Conclusion

If you want a device that works great for drawing right out of the box, this is not it. You’ll need to do some tinkering. If you’re tech savvy enough to do it and have enough patience to deal with it, you’ve got yourself a great little digital sketching device for about $380. (VivoTab $300, Bamboo Stylus $40, case $15, Manga Studio 5 $25)

Don’t expect any sort of Surface Pro or Cintiq killer here, as this is clearly a device geared towards portability and low price point over drawing experience. For what it is though, the drawing experience is pretty solid!

You can buy it with free shipping from the Microsoft Store website, or just hop on over to your local Microsoft Store, where they’ll likely have it on display near the front of the store.

Happy drawing!

tally-art:

New art!  I was delighted to return to Sarah Mirk’s project Sex From Scratch this month.  I drew 10 portraits of the book’s contributors (Andi Zeisler, Aya DeLeon, Betty Dodson, Erika Moen, Michelle Tea, Stu Rasmussen, Tracy Clark-Flory, Tristan Taormino, Tomas Moniz, Wendy-O Matik).

The book drops in August from Microcosm Publishing.  Reserve your copy now! 

You can also see the rough sketches of my initial series of illustrations for the book here

randalltumble:

The final page from “The Train to Avalon Bay” is up today. Here’s the page without text, so you can feast your peepers on Jeremy’s wonderful colors unhindered. The conclusion of the tale’s posting coincides rather nicely with the release of the collected story in the Dark Horse Trade Paperback! Originally set to come out this Wednesday, a last-minute shipping issue has pushed it back till next Wednesday April 16th instead— but do not fear! This Friday April 11 we are now hosting the pre-release party at Bridge City Comics, where you’ll be able to pick up the shiny volume and have it signed and sketched in before it even hits the stands! See you there!

Intel’s Empowering Innovators series talks to Periscope’s @Jonathan_Case

vimeo:

Cartoonist Jonathan Case relies on new-fangled tablet technology to sketch, shade, and… scare the King of Horror?

See how in Intel’s Empowering Innovators series. #lookinside

Story by Jeremy Barlow, art by Dustin Weaver, part 1of 2 dustinweaver:

They’ll Bury You Where You Stand! pages 1-3

Published in Outlaw Territory Vol.2

Story - Jeremy Barlow & Dustin Weaver

Script - Jeremy Barlow

Art - Dustin Weaver

Lettering - Thomas Mauer

Story by Jeremy Barlow, art by dustinweaver:

They’ll Bury You Where You Stand!

pages 4-6

Published in Outlaw Territory Vol.2

Story - Jeremy Barlow & Dustin Weaver

Script - Jeremy Barlow

Art - Dustin Weaver

Lettering - Thomas Mauer

Today’s Tragedy Series really demands to be seen on a good-sized screen.
tragedyseries:

It is that time of year again: my heart swells with excitement at the prospect of interaction with fellow comics enthusiasts at the Emerald City Comicon (this upcoming weekend.) You can find me at table 1214.  I hope to see you there! For those of you unable to attend, I will imagine the enjoyment we might have had while looking wistfully to the horizon. I will also make my convention inventory available in my etsy emporium.

Today’s Tragedy Series really demands to be seen on a good-sized screen.

tragedyseries:

It is that time of year again: my heart swells with excitement at the prospect of interaction with fellow comics enthusiasts at the Emerald City Comicon (this upcoming weekend.) You can find me at table 1214.  I hope to see you there! 

For those of you unable to attend, I will imagine the enjoyment we might have had while looking wistfully to the horizon. I will also make my convention inventory available in my etsy emporium.

randalltumble:

PUBLIC NOTICE IS GIVEN: A fine Assortment of Trekker Posters and Prints will be On Offer this weekend at ECCC 2014 at Booth #1214. All and sundry are welcome to visit and enjoy at their leisure.

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